The adequate, and (v) the rural community as a

The Food and Agriculture Ministry appointed a
Committee in 1952 to examine the Grow More Food activities of the Government
which were in implementation and to suggest measures for ensuring rapid
expansion of agricultural production. The Grow More Food Campaign Inquiry
Committee observed that increase in agriculture production was very important
for the elimination of hunger in rural areas of the country. The Committee came
to the conclusion that it was only by bringing about an appreciable improvement
in the standards of rural life to make it fuller and richer that the rural
masses could be awakened to take interest in not only increasing agricultural
production but also improving their own conditions and creating a will to live
better. The committee also pointed out that:

(i)                
all
aspects of village life were interrelated,

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(ii)  improvement could be brought about by a number of
detached programmes operating independently

(iii)           
 there
was lack of unity of efforts

(iv)            
 the
available finance was not adequate, and

(v)       
 the
rural community as a whole did not participate effectively in the campaign. In
short, “the movement did not arouse nation-wide enthusiasm and did not
become a mass movement for raising the level of village life”.

 

In its recommendations, the Committee proposed
the formation of development block, each consisting of 100 to 120 villages, and
the appointment of revenue officers as development officers or extension
officers, assisted by technical officers for agriculture, animal husbandry,
co-ordination and engineering. For actual work in villages, the Committee
suggested the appointment of one village level worker for every five or ten
villages. He will be the joint agent for all development activities and will
convey to the farmer, the lessons of research, and to experts the problems of
the farmers, and arrange supplies and services needed by the farmers, including
preliminary assistance in the animal and plant disease. The
Committee pointed out that
there was need of an organisation for intensive rural work which would reach
every farmer and