In became popular, at the start of the 20th

In terms of Building Layout, it is seen that three arrangements evolved with time. The first one being the ‘Resort Style’. Early sanatoria built before 1885 represented this style. They were actually modified private houses, mansions or hotels providing few specialized patient areas. 7

Then came the ‘Cottage Style’. It had a central administration block connected to a number of small patient cottages accommodating 2-6 patients in each cottage. This style had a spreading layout with and there were different categories of patient areas. 7

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

With Sir Joseph Lister’s discovery of antiseptics, it was recognized that the careful cleaning of wounds and sterilization lessened the spread of disease through bacteria. Hence physical isolation of patients in cottages was no more required. This is when the ‘Pavilion Style’ of sanatoria became popular, at the start of the 20th century. This design was more economical and efficient. It had one multi-storied building normally 3-4 stories high. The patient pavilions were connected to the administration through corridors or covered walkways. 7

Need for Aftercare colony

Although tuberculosis was not entirely a disease of the poor but it was mainly the working class that was attacked by it. Instead of private sanatoria that were for people who could afford a stay at the resort, the ‘Volksheilstätten’ (sanatoria for the people in German), or (sanatoria for the workers), became part of a strategy to confront the spreading disease. Therefore, the Red cross, and some industrial and insurance companies began to build sanatoria for the recovery of their workers so that they could get back on duty. i  

The treatment in these early sanatoria wasn’t much of a success. The patients did get well under the therapy but they suffered relapse sooner or later. This was a major problem as the consumptives came back to the same condition even after proper treatment. Hence, a need for after care of these patients now became a requirement.

In a book published in 1943, Lord Horder, considering why tuberculosis had not yet been bought under control, wrote, that the answer to this question is that “Varrier Jones is the only person who did see the problem of tuberculosis and did see it whole.” ii

 

Papworth Village Settlement, Cambridgeshire, (1916-20)

Work in tuberculosis in the new colony system was started by Dr. Pendrill Varrier Jones, a Welsh physician. After finishing his medical training in 1910, he started his research in tuberculosis at Cambridge university. Varrier Jones did not believe that tuberculosis could be fully cured, he understood the need for an institution that could give permanent treatment to the consumptives. Even if the disease had been arrested and healthy living conditions were established, there was always a chance of relapse. It was even more dangerous when the ex-patient was back to work for which he wasn’t physically and medically fit, surrounded by unhygienic conditions and lack of suitable diet and nourishment. It was these conclusions that lead to the establishment of the Cambridgeshire tuberculosis colony at Bourn in 1916, which was then later expanded to the Papworth Village settlement in 1918. The papworth settlement served as a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients as well as an after care colony for their return to society. 9

The estate acquired for the colony was at Papworth to the west of Cambridgeshire. The area of the estate was about 350 acres. This site was chosen considering the requirement of a large area, and as the region was isolated it benefitted the establishment of a village settlement, away from the disturbance of the overcrowded and dusty towns. And according to Dr. Varrier it too was an advantage in term recreation, the village settlement encouraged patients to have their leisure activities within the community, rather than traveling to the neighboring towns. The main part of the establishment was on a slight rise, well elevated from the adjoining areas. On the east of the settlement was a woodland that provided shelter from the winds.

Figure 1 shows the master plan of the village settlement. At the center towards the right of the road is the main administrative area (Papworth Hall) and separate hospitals for male and female. Down below in the corner is the sanatorium block in South park which also included individual shelters for men. On the other side of the road are the hostels and separate cottages for the consumptives. Far left are the industries and workshops.

Compared to other sanatoria certain new principles for the treatment of tuberculosis were applied here at Papworth. These principles were set by Dr. Varrier Jones himself.

The colony was exclusively established for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. Patients in all stages of the disease; the early stage, the intermediate cases and the advanced cases, were treated here. The febrile cases were taken to the hospitals for treatment. The afebrile cases were described as sanatorium cases and were taken to the shelters. The shelters were mainly for those patients whose diseaseIn terms of Building Layout, it is seen that three arrangements evolved with time. The first one being the ‘Resort Style’. Early sanatoria built before 1885 represented this style. They were actually modified private houses, mansions or hotels providing few specialized patient areas. 7

Then came the ‘Cottage Style’. It had a central administration block connected to a number of small patient cottages accommodating 2-6 patients in each cottage. This style had a spreading layout with and there were different categories of patient areas. 7

With Sir Joseph Lister’s discovery of antiseptics, it was recognized that the careful cleaning of wounds and sterilization lessened the spread of disease through bacteria. Hence physical isolation of patients in cottages was no more required. This is when the ‘Pavilion Style’ of sanatoria became popular, at the start of the 20th century. This design was more economical and efficient. It had one multi-storied building normally 3-4 stories high. The patient pavilions were connected to the administration through corridors or covered walkways. 7

Need for Aftercare colony

Although tuberculosis was not entirely a disease of the poor but it was mainly the working class that was attacked by it. Instead of private sanatoria that were for people who could afford a stay at the resort, the ‘Volksheilstätten’ (sanatoria for the people in German), or (sanatoria for the workers), became part of a strategy to confront the spreading disease. Therefore, the Red cross, and some industrial and insurance companies began to build sanatoria for the recovery of their workers so that they could get back on duty. i  

The treatment in these early sanatoria wasn’t much of a success. The patients did get well under the therapy but they suffered relapse sooner or later. This was a major problem as the consumptives came back to the same condition even after proper treatment. Hence, a need for after care of these patients now became a requirement.

In a book published in 1943, Lord Horder, considering why tuberculosis had not yet been bought under control, wrote, that the answer to this question is that “Varrier Jones is the only person who did see the problem of tuberculosis and did see it whole.” ii

 

Papworth Village Settlement, Cambridgeshire, (1916-20)

Work in tuberculosis in the new colony system was started by Dr. Pendrill Varrier Jones, a Welsh physician. After finishing his medical training in 1910, he started his research in tuberculosis at Cambridge university. Varrier Jones did not believe that tuberculosis could be fully cured, he understood the need for an institution that could give permanent treatment to the consumptives. Even if the disease had been arrested and healthy living conditions were established, there was always a chance of relapse. It was even more dangerous when the ex-patient was back to work for which he wasn’t physically and medically fit, surrounded by unhygienic conditions and lack of suitable diet and nourishment. It was these conclusions that lead to the establishment of the Cambridgeshire tuberculosis colony at Bourn in 1916, which was then later expanded to the Papworth Village settlement in 1918. The papworth settlement served as a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients as well as an after care colony for their return to society. 9

The estate acquired for the colony was at Papworth to the west of Cambridgeshire. The area of the estate was about 350 acres. This site was chosen considering the requirement of a large area, and as the region was isolated it benefitted the establishment of a village settlement, away from the disturbance of the overcrowded and dusty towns. And according to Dr. Varrier it too was an advantage in term recreation, the village settlement encouraged patients to have their leisure activities within the community, rather than traveling to the neighboring towns. The main part of the establishment was on a slight rise, well elevated from the adjoining areas. On the east of the settlement was a woodland that provided shelter from the winds.

Figure 1 shows the master plan of the village settlement. At the center towards the right of the road is the main administrative area (Papworth Hall) and separate hospitals for male and female. Down below in the corner is the sanatorium block in South park which also included individual shelters for men. On the other side of the road are the hostels and separate cottages for the consumptives. Far left are the industries and workshops.

Compared to other sanatoria certain new principles for the treatment of tuberculosis were applied here at Papworth. These principles were set by Dr. Varrier Jones himself.

The colony was exclusively established for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. Patients in all stages of the disease; the early stage, the intermediate cases and the advanced cases, were treated here. The febrile cases were taken to the hospitals for treatment. The afebrile cases were described as sanatorium cases and were taken to the shelters. The shelters were mainly for those patients whose disease was arrested but they still were in need of medical supervision. After treatment under sanatorium shelters, when patients were better than before, they were then discharged to the village settlement. This included separate hostels for unmarried men and women, and cottages for those who were married so that they could live with their families.